Angers Cathedral

Angers, France

Angers Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Maurice d'Angers) was constructed in the 12th and 13th centuries on the orders of bishops Normand de Doué and Guillaume de Beaumont after the original building burnt down in 1032. The original Romanesque church was rebuilt with Gothic details in the mid 12th century. The single-aisle plan was vaulted with pointed arches resting on a re-clad interior elevation. The nave consists of three simple bays, with single bays on either side of a crossing forming transepts, followed by a single-bay choir, backed by an apse.

The striking west front is exceptionally narrow and tall. The lowest level dates from c.1170, the twin towers (70m and 77m high) date from the 15th century and the central tower was added in the 16th century. At the base of the central tower are sculptures of St Maurice and his companions, with a prayer for peace above.

The high altar is Baroque (1758), designed by Henri Gervais. Six monolithic columns support the canopy. Legend has it that Gervais was carried to it while he was dying, so he could give last instructions on its design. The enormous wooden pulpit dates from 1855 and was designed by a priest named Choyer. Its carvings illustrate the theme of the Word of God, with Moses on the left side and St John receiving his revelation on the right.

The treasury, housed in a spacious room off the north aisle, contains some fine medieval croziers and other religious objects. The transept's stained glass window of Saint Julian is considered a masterpiece of French 13th century glass work.

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Address

Place Freppel 1, Angers, France
See all sites in Angers

Details

Founded: 12th-13th centuries
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

François Guerraz (8 months ago)
Classic mid-size French cathedral
Joe Cabello (8 months ago)
Amazing place to visit.
Norbert Lovas (13 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral. Nothing to comment, i recommend to have it on your list.
Carbo Kuo (15 months ago)
This is the most beautiful place to visit in Angers.
Ramey Salem (2 years ago)
Unique and fits perfectly for Angers Everything is this city is harmonic, a great religious place that you feel the greatness of peace, love and faith when you are inside. Lots of history like all other Cathedrals in France, in a huge simplified presentation. God Bless.
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