Museé des Beaux Arts

Angers, France

The museum of fine arts in Angers is arranged according to two themes: the history of Angers told through works of art from Neolithic to modern times and fine arts from the 14th century. Don’t miss the intriguing display of religious antiquities on the first floor.

References:
  • Eyewitness Travel Guide: Loire Valley. 2007

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Category: Museums in France

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musees.angers.fr

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philibert Ducoin (4 months ago)
Beau musée de peintures.Bien vu les puzzles de peintures en cours de musée pour les plus jeunes. Partie intéressante sur l'histoire d'Angers. Dommage qu'il n'y ai pas de réductions Famille Nombreuse.
Daniel Nordberg (4 months ago)
This is a great museum in a beautiful building dating back to the 15th century. Must be visited if you're in Angers for 2 or 3 days. The are permanent and non permanent exhibits.
Xavier Benony (5 months ago)
Place Saint Elou à Angers. On y voit l'entrée du musée des beaux arts, l'institut municipal des langues et la tour Saint Aubin. La place est magnifiquement restaurée et animée. C'est un endroit convivial sans voitures. A découvrir
y.m b. (9 months ago)
Visited for free during Angers summer festival. An exhibition on animals was on display. Well displayed and organized. Nice place outside the museum too.
Peter van den Besselaar (2 years ago)
Remarkably nice staff. Impressive building with nice outside neon art from Francois Morrelet. A good flower painting from Tilburg born artist Gérard van Spaendonck. Small but adorable modern art section.
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