San Nicolás Church

Pamplona, Spain

San Nicolás church was built in the 12th century not only with religious functions, but also as a defensive bastion of the quarter during the strife with the neighbouring ones of St. Saturnino and Navarrería. The military role is evident in the watch tower. In 1222 the original Romanesque church was destroyed by a fire, and was replaced by a new building, consecrated in 1231.

The interior is in Gothic style, from different phases. It houses a Baroque organ. Exteriorly, of the Gothic period only two portal are visible today, as well as the apse. The corner portico was designed by Angel Goicoechea and built by a local contractor Blas Morte in the 1880s.

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Founded: 1231
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

KAWA LAW93 (2 years ago)
Good Chapel
RIJO PAUL (4 years ago)
It's a good Church with prayerful atmosphere and the organ that they have is excellent
Amir Din (5 years ago)
Very beautiful architecture
Игорь Игоревич Хохлов (5 years ago)
A magnificent church in Pamplona in the historical centre of the city. There are lots of cafes around, so you can enjoy the church, relax with a cup of coffee and feel yourself a true pilgrim, walking down the El Camino de Santiago.
Julian Worker (5 years ago)
Visitors should go to this church when visiting Pamplona.
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