St. Peter's Church

Chartres, France

Saint Peter’s (Saint-Pierre) church was formerly an abbey church of the Benedictines. The abbey church was founded in the 7th century with the help of Queen Bathilde, the wife of Clovis II. The most important vestige of the church is a convent buildings located on the south side, later rebuilt in early 18th century, and nowadays served as a school named Lycee Marceau.

The church was destroyed several times by Normans between 858 and 911. It has also been damaged by fire in 1077 and 1134. Reconstruction of the apse and ambulatory has taken in 1165 under the direction of Bilduard with less financial support. The tomb of Gilduin, a bishop of Breton, who died in 1077 and buried in the church was discovered during the work. This discovery encouraged donations from the congregations and allowed the continuation of the reconstruction of the church and also supported the construction of Chartres cathedral tour and royal portal.

The most ancient part of the church is the bell tower on the west side, built around the year 1000 AD. The nave and the aisles date from the early 13th century. The church was finally completed around the year 1320. During French revolution, the church has seized and served as a saltpeter factory - then finally returned to its original function as a worship place in 1803 and nowadays regularly host the Organ Festival. St. Peter’s church opens from Monday to Friday at 2pm to 6pm and you can enter the church for free.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1000 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.discover-chartres.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Linh Nguyen (8 months ago)
I love how it ages. I love how it looks really ancien and original. I hope even if they restore it they'll still keep that real look.
Yaron Bental (8 months ago)
Spectacularly beautiful, enormous, i love how the old is preserved and more modern work is intertwined and fit perfectly
Barbara (15 months ago)
After spending several days at Chartres Cathedral I was humbled to enter this Cathedral through the Gothic red door symbolizing the womb of the Great Mother. In it's erie solitude and disrepair I was transported to earlier times in history. A reverence for history descended, not guilded but pure. The slanted cobbled floors were easier to maintain when horses came into the environment. The layers of painted and peeling motifs exposed the art of the ages. The wood latice and white marble statue in the Apse, a smaller version of the Chartres Cathedral was beautiful in the natural light even laced with cobwebs. The interior natural light was exquisite through the stained glass. There is a seated Black Madonna near the transcept entry with fresh Lilies lay at Her and His feet. A juxtaposion of the physical world to an aged time caught and suspended.
Bernard Brinkworth (3 years ago)
Good food and price
Bernard Brinkworth (3 years ago)
Good food and price
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