St. Peter's Church

Chartres, France

Saint Peter’s (Saint-Pierre) church was formerly an abbey church of the Benedictines. The abbey church was founded in the 7th century with the help of Queen Bathilde, the wife of Clovis II. The most important vestige of the church is a convent buildings located on the south side, later rebuilt in early 18th century, and nowadays served as a school named Lycee Marceau.

The church was destroyed several times by Normans between 858 and 911. It has also been damaged by fire in 1077 and 1134. Reconstruction of the apse and ambulatory has taken in 1165 under the direction of Bilduard with less financial support. The tomb of Gilduin, a bishop of Breton, who died in 1077 and buried in the church was discovered during the work. This discovery encouraged donations from the congregations and allowed the continuation of the reconstruction of the church and also supported the construction of Chartres cathedral tour and royal portal.

The most ancient part of the church is the bell tower on the west side, built around the year 1000 AD. The nave and the aisles date from the early 13th century. The church was finally completed around the year 1320. During French revolution, the church has seized and served as a saltpeter factory - then finally returned to its original function as a worship place in 1803 and nowadays regularly host the Organ Festival. St. Peter’s church opens from Monday to Friday at 2pm to 6pm and you can enter the church for free.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: ca. 1000 AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.discover-chartres.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Barbara (8 months ago)
After spending several days at Chartres Cathedral I was humbled to enter this Cathedral through the Gothic red door symbolizing the womb of the Great Mother. In it's erie solitude and disrepair I was transported to earlier times in history. A reverence for history descended, not guilded but pure. The slanted cobbled floors were easier to maintain when horses came into the environment. The layers of painted and peeling motifs exposed the art of the ages. The wood latice and white marble statue in the Apse, a smaller version of the Chartres Cathedral was beautiful in the natural light even laced with cobwebs. The interior natural light was exquisite through the stained glass. There is a seated Black Madonna near the transcept entry with fresh Lilies lay at Her and His feet. A juxtaposion of the physical world to an aged time caught and suspended.
Bernard Brinkworth (2 years ago)
Good food and price
Bernard Brinkworth (2 years ago)
Good food and price
Vadim Cherny (2 years ago)
Beautifully arrange window lighting
Jane Etherton dite Madame Thermomix (2 years ago)
Totally amazing church whose stained glass windows are illuminated from the inside at night, producing the most beautiful effect! The "Chartres en Lumières" visual light media show runs throughout the city from April to October and the Église St Pierre is one of the most beautiful edifices. We took the Little Train (Le Petit Train) from the Cathedral square and saw all the illuminated sites, and went back to St Pierre to get a second look. Fantastic!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kraków Cloth Hall

The Cloth Hall in Kraków dates to the Renaissance and is one of the city's most recognizable icons. It is the central feature of the main market square in the Kraków Old Town (listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978).

The hall was once a major centre of international trade. Traveling merchants met there to discuss business and to barter. During its golden age in the 15th century, the hall was the source of a variety of exotic imports from the east – spices, silk, leather and wax – while Kraków itself exported textiles, lead, and salt from the Wieliczka Salt Mine.

Kraków was Poland's capital city and was among the largest cities in Europe already from before the time of the Renaissance. However, its decline started with the move of the capital to Warsaw in the very end of the 16th century. The city's decline was hastened by wars and politics leading to the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century. By the time of the architectural restoration proposed for the cloth hall in 1870 under Austrian rule, much of the historic city center was decrepit. A change in political and economic fortunes for the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria ushered in a revival due to newly established Legislative Assembly or Sejm of the Land. The successful renovation of the Cloth Hall, based on design by Tomasz Pryliński and supervised by Mayor Mikołaj Zyblikiewicz, Sejm Marshal, was one of the most notable achievements of this period.

The hall has hosted many distinguished guests over the centuries and is still used to entertain monarchs and dignitaries, such as Charles, Prince of Wales and Emperor Akihito of Japan, who was welcomed here in 2002. In the past, balls were held here, most notably after Prince Józef Poniatowski had briefly liberated the city from the Austrians in 1809. Aside from its history and cultural value, the hall still is still used as a center of commerce.

On the upper floor of the hall is the Sukiennice Museum division of the National Museum, Kraków. It holds the largest permanent exhibit of the 19th-century Polish painting and sculpture, in four grand exhibition halls arranged by historical period and the theme extending into an entire artistic epoch. The museum was upgraded in 2010 with new technical equipment, storerooms, service spaces as well as improved thematic layout for the display.

The Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art was a major cultural venue from the moment it opened on October 7, 1879. It features late Baroque, Rococo, and Classicist 18th-century portraits and battle scenes by Polish and foreign pre-Romantics.