Château de Châteaudun

Châteaudun, France

Château de Châteaudun was built between the 12th and 16th centuries. The Count of Blois Thibaut V had the keep built around 1170. The Sainte-Chapelle was built between 1451 and 1493. The choir and the high chapel were built between 1451 and 1454, with the nave and the oratory between 1460 and 1464. Jehan de Dunois, the bâtard d'Orléans (Bastard of Orléans), built the west wing (the "aile Dunois") between 1459 and 1468. The bell tower was erected in 1493.

François I of Orléans-Longueville began construction of the north wing between 1469 and 1491. The upper floors were added by François II d'Orléans-Longueville and his descendants during the first quarter of the 16th century.

Today the castle includes a keep, a chapel (Sainte-Chapelle), the Dunois wing and the Longueville wing. Château de Châteaudun overlooks the Loir river. Perched on a limestone outcrop, it shows its origins as a 12th century fortress. Converted during the Renaissance into a comfortable residence, the main body of the building is roofed in the gothic style. It still has, notably, a finely carved staircase from this period. Renovated since the 1930s, the castle has been classed as a historic monument since 1918.

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Details

Founded: 1170
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Longstaff (11 months ago)
Lovely little town and a great chateau to ramble around for a modest entry fee
Gerald Burton (12 months ago)
Ancient area of Chareaudun. Well worth a visit for history buffs.
Merlijn Krijntjes (13 months ago)
An amazing place to visit and experience all the history. The chateau itself can be visited by yourself but the 12th century tower can only be visited with a french guided tour. Well worth the time.
Karen Kerr (16 months ago)
Great overnight camper stop chateau lovely, very peaceful with the river, facilities clean
René Christensen (2 years ago)
Really exciting place where you want to come back ... have been there several times over the past 8 years and you can see that it is improving continuously. In addition, entering the price is fine and you can pack your car close to. I would like to recommend that you go in and see the place ... and maybe a trip into the square in the city center, which is within walking distance of the castle.
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