Tampere Cathedral

Tampere, Finland

The national romantic cathedral was designed by Lars Sonck and built between 1902 and 1907. In the beginning of the 20th century Russification was a governmental policy of the Russian Empire aimed at limiting the special status of the Grand Duchy of Finland and possibly the termination of its autonomy. This caused the rise of the national romanticism in Finland and Tampere Cathedral was one of the most remarkable examples of the new national spirit.

The cathedral is famous for its frescoes, painted by renowned symbolist Hugo Simberg. The paintings aroused considerable critique in their time, featuring versions of Simberg's The Wounded Angel and The Garden of Death. Of particular controversy was Simberg's painting of a winged serpent on a red background in the highest point of the ceiling, which his contemporaries interpreted as a symbol of sin and corruption.

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Details

Founded: 1902-1907
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Hugill (2 years ago)
The cathedral is a striking complete work of art, inside and out, and we had a very helpful and informative talk from the guardian
Irene Cotrina (2 years ago)
The cathedral of Tampere is an exceptional church, beautiful in winter, surrounded by snow and in summer amongst colourful flowers. Usually, I am not moved by Lutheran churches, being too mimimal for my taste. But this one has two beautiful, albeit controversial frescoes. Go and see for yourself, definitely worth a visit!
Juhani Tamminen (2 years ago)
Very lutherian in the sense there's not much glamour or glitter there. Good place for quiet contemplation.
Karri Huhtanen (2 years ago)
listening bach and movie music played with organs
Meg N. Le (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral, about 10 - 15 minutes walk from bus station. Great for sight-seeing
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