Tampere Cathedral

Tampere, Finland

The national romantic cathedral was designed by Lars Sonck and built between 1902 and 1907. In the beginning of the 20th century Russification was a governmental policy of the Russian Empire aimed at limiting the special status of the Grand Duchy of Finland and possibly the termination of its autonomy. This caused the rise of the national romanticism in Finland and Tampere Cathedral was one of the most remarkable examples of the new national spirit.

The cathedral is famous for its frescoes, painted by renowned symbolist Hugo Simberg. The paintings aroused considerable critique in their time, featuring versions of Simberg's The Wounded Angel and The Garden of Death. Of particular controversy was Simberg's painting of a winged serpent on a red background in the highest point of the ceiling, which his contemporaries interpreted as a symbol of sin and corruption.

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Details

Founded: 1902-1907
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sir Brian (7 months ago)
Very nice and a definite place to visit!
Jef Geeraerts (9 months ago)
A nice cathedral but the most interesting part about it are the frescos of Hugo Simberg one of Finland's best known painters
Mira (16 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral with interesting design and paintings.
Eetu Lehtovirta (17 months ago)
Absolutely beatiful paintings inside. Would reconmend.
Karl S (22 months ago)
Interesting asymmetric architecture on the outside and beautiful inside.
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