The St. Birgit Memorial Church

Lempäälä, Finland

The St. Birgit Memorial Church was built probably between years 1502-1505. It is dedicated in memory of St. Birgit who died in Rome in 1373 and was proclaimed as a saint in 1391.

Situated on the bordering area between the historic districts of Satakunta and Häme, the architectural style of the church exhibits certain influences from both of these areas. The shapes of the nave, rich in decoration, are typical of Satakunta, whereas the large, protruding cornerstones are unique to a very few number of churches in Häme.

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Details

Founded: 1502-1505
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

www.lempaalanseurakunta.fi

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tapani koskinen (2 years ago)
Kaunis vanha kirkko keskellä kaupunkia.
jari fredriksson (2 years ago)
Keskiaikainen kivikirkko.
Jenna Lehtimäki (2 years ago)
Hyvä Ripari kirkko! Kaikki mahtuu sisälle! Muutenki tosi hyvä kuntoinen ja kaunis
Marko M (2 years ago)
Hieno keskiaikainen kivikirkko, jota tosin jälkipolvet ovat restauroineet ehkä hieman "ajattelemattomasti". Värikkäät lasi-ikkunat tekivät vaikutuksen, samoin pääsisäänkäynnin puoleisella seinällä olevat suuret aatelisvaakunat
Karipekka Lakela (3 years ago)
Beautiful old church
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