Krapperup Castle

Höganäs, Sweden

The Krapperup estate dates from medieval times, but the existing manor, except the wings, is from the 16th century. When the Podebusk family built the castle, Skåne was still part of Denmark. The seven-pointed star, which is Gyldenstierne’s coat-of-arms, was added to the facades at the beginning of the 1600s. Denmark lost Skåne to Sweden in 1658, with Krapperup’s first Swedish owner being Maria Sophia de la Gardie. In the 1700s, the Hildebrands and then the von Kochen family owned the estate, and it was finally inherited by the Gyllenstierna family, with the seven-pointed star, in the 19th century.

The state rooms, with their Victorian interiors, are all situated in the main building, leaving the wings for the family’s private apartments. The gardens, covering about 80 acres, developed during the 19th century from their previous formal and utilitarian design into the present romantic layout with winding paths, carp ponds, an abundance of rhododendrons and an attractive rose garden.

The former estate in tail of Krapperup was converted into a foundation in 1967. This was with the aim of preserving the castle and the gardens in their surrounding rural landscape. The estate continues to be run as before by the family, with a well functioning agricultural holding of about 5,000 acres.

The old farm buildings around the former stableyard now house a museum and art gallery, a music hall and a small café and shop for visitors. The manor is open for prebooked visits only, but the gardens are accessible throughout the whole year.

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Details

Founded: 1570s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesper (18 months ago)
Very calm and large park behind the courtyard and manor to have a nice stroll through.
Reyes Martinez (2 years ago)
The food is super specially the fish outstanding good. The big garden is nice you can see they take good care for it.
Andreas Larsson (2 years ago)
Excellent park and cafe with ok prices.
Oscar Pihlström (2 years ago)
Rainy but nice
Magnus Kenneby (3 years ago)
Lovely strools in the park and nice café. Impressive castle, though not available to the public (unless booked in advance and then only on specific dates for a fee)
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