The Rök Runestone is one of the most famous runestones, featuring the longest known runic inscription in stone. It is considered the first piece of written Swedish literature and thus it marks the beginning of the history of Swedish literature.

The stone was discovered built into the wall of the church in the 19th century and removed from the church wall a few decades later. The church was built in the 12th century, and it was common to use rune stones as building material for churches. The stone was probably carved in the early 9th century, judging from the main runic alphabet used ("short-twig" runes) and the form of the language. It is covered with runes on five sides, all except the base part that was to be put under ground. A few parts of the inscription are damaged, but most of it remains readable.

The name "Rök Stone" is something of a tautology: the stone is named after the village, "Rök", but the village is probably named after the stone, "Rauk" or "Rök" meaning "skittle-shaped stack/stone" in Old Norse.

The stone is unique in a number of ways. It contains a fragment of what is believed to be a lost piece of Norse mythology. It also makes a historical reference to Ostrogothic king (effectively emperor of the western Roman empire) Theodoric the Great. It contains the longest extant pre-Christian runic inscription - around 760 characters, and it is a virtuoso display of the carver's mastery of runic expression.

The inscription is partially encrypted in two ways; by displacement and by using special cipher runes. The inscription is intentionally challenging to read, using kennings in the manner of Old Norse skaldic poetry, and demonstrating the carver's command of different alphabets and writing styles (including code). The obscurity may perhaps even be part of a magic ritual.

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Address

Rök, Ödeshög, Sweden
See all sites in Ödeshög

Details

Founded: 800 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Heath (2 years ago)
A Rune stone and a trail for walking around various historical sites.
Sander van helvoort (2 years ago)
It's a beautiful stone with a big story. It's nice if you 're passing by or on your way to visit the ruin Monastery a little further to the lake. The church is not really interesting.
Hans-Peter Liedtke (2 years ago)
Nice place to be for a short stay
Veronica Setterhall (2 years ago)
Nice and very interesting exhibition with the history and interpretation of the stone. Some parts are a bit tricky to read due to the contrast between the text and the background.
Jonas Næsby (2 years ago)
This was a very nice place and thanks for showing this old stone. We have our own in Jelling, Denmark.
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