Siggebohyttan

Nora, Sweden

Siggebohyttan is an unusual large house of bergsman family, who where exempted from taxes but had to mine and produce iron to the crown. This system was in use from the Middle Ages to the late 1800s. Siggebohyttan, built in 1790, is today a museum.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Siggebohyttan 150, Nora, Sweden
See all sites in Nora

Details

Founded: 1790
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

www.orebrolansmuseum.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Egholt (3 years ago)
Trevligt museum för forna levnadsvanor
Bo Molander (3 years ago)
Fantastisk miljö med bevarad kultur. Väl värt ett besök!
lars gustafsson (3 years ago)
Bra o härlig plats. Idyllisk miljö
Florian Seidenthal (3 years ago)
En del av Bergslagens historia väldigt bra bevarad absolut värd ett besök. Och utsikten över Usken är ju oslagbar. Midsommarfirande så som Julmarknad är återkommande och populära evenemang!
susanne hager (3 years ago)
Sevärt . Svensk historia bevarat
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