Höjentorp Castle Ruins

Axvall, Sweden

The castle ruins in Gamla Höjentorp dates back to the 13th century. The castle is said to have been donated to the bishop of Skara in 1284, but was then returned to the crown at the time of Gustav Vasa’s reformation. At the middle of the 17th century, Queen Kristina gave the castle as a wedding gift to Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie’s wife, Maria Eufrosyne. In 1722 the castle burnt down and it is said that Queen Ulrika Eleonora was visiting at the time. She watched the fire from a nearby hill, which was then named after this Drottningkullen (the Queen Hill).

Today only the ruins of the basement remain of the original castle, but the place bears witness of the importance of this area in the Middle Ages, which was also when Skara had its period of greatness. In the overgrown castle garden are beautiful ashes and lime-trees and in the slope down towards the Garden Lake it smells of ramsons and other rare plants.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1284
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.runesnruins.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders Hollberg (2 years ago)
Mycket natur skön plats för avstressning. Verkligen vackert.
Linda Börjesson (2 years ago)
En av de fina platserna i Wallebygden, med många vandrings leder.
Henrik Lidström (2 years ago)
Mycket intressant och en underbar vacker natur
Christer Ehn (3 years ago)
Väldigt fin natur och små sjöar
Tobias H (3 years ago)
Sevärt ställe med mycket historia. Underbart att besöka när ramslöken blommar!
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