Alnarp Castle

Lomma, Sweden

Alnarp Castle was originally built in the 12th century. In 1325 Alnarp came into the possession of a knight named Anders Pedersen, and then Aage Nielsen Ulfeldt in the early 15th century. In 1449, Alnarp passed into the ownership of Niels Stigsen Thott. The Ulfeldt and the Thott families were members of the Scanian nobility. The castle eventually passed to the Krummedige family, and in 1500 it was owned by Erik Krummedige, a cousin of Henrik Krummedige, and an advisor to the Danish king. In 1536, Christian III took possession of the castle for the Danish state.

After the Treaty of Roskilde in 1658, king Charles X Gustav of Sweden gave the castle to a commandant of Malmö, Johan von Essen. In 1660, Charles XI gave it to Gabriel Oxenstierna. From 1694, it became the residence for the Governors-General of Sweden in Scania.The present building was erected in 1862, in French Renaissance style. Today the castle houses offices and meeting rooms used by the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. The castle park has the second highest variety of trees in Sweden and is open to the public all year.

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Slottsvägen 5, Lomma, Sweden
See all sites in Lomma

Details

Founded: 1862
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.slu.se

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