Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.

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Details

Founded: 1740s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
engso.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cedric Crespo (2 years ago)
Is very interesting place to check out the aristocratic societies the Medieval ages
Romuald Menuet (2 years ago)
Perfect for a breakfast with typical pastries
Patrick Walsh (3 years ago)
Lovely place whatever the season
Persian Aurora (3 years ago)
Nice place, beautiful view. Historic land mark
Robert Walter (4 years ago)
It is a wonderfull place. Trees become old yes but if they have to replaced, here they do it congratulation. Continue to do so
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