Granhult Church

Norrhult, Sweden

Granhult Church, built around 1220, is the oldest surviving wooden building in Sweden and one of the greatest cultural treasures of the region. it was intended to be demolished in 1829, but due the resistance of the inhabitants it was left to stay. The church was returned to worship use in 1879.

The interior dates mainly from the 17th and 18th centuries.The altarpiece was painted by Torbern Char in 1699. The walls are richly decorated with paintings dating from 1750s, although traces of medieval paintings also remain. Musical evenings and other events take place here during the summer. Guided tours of the church are available.

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Details

Founded: 1220s
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tommy Sundling (7 months ago)
Ganska lugnt läge. Det är ju inte så många gånger jag varit på vägen sidan av den.
Ann Gerd (8 months ago)
Såg kyrkan under en bilresa för cirka 30 år sedan. Har haft den på näthinnan. Den var så speciell och gjorde sånt intryck. Men jag hade glömt vad den hette...nu har jag sökt på kyrkobilder i hela Småland och hittat Granhult! Fantastiskt vacker. Måste dit igen, men jag bor 90 mil bort...
Melli Wika (8 months ago)
Jättevacker och mysig träkyrka med fin inomhus hand-måleri. Kyrkan var öppen men det var lite kluringt att komma in pga speciella handtag som bidrar också med charmen till kyrkans ''gammaldags'' stämning.
Jonas Jerner (2 years ago)
Fin Kyrka och plats!
romywebb se (2 years ago)
Otrolig imponerande och vacker gamal träkyrka. Väl bevarad. Inventarier och måleriet är en konst i sig som fascinerar. Allt ger en känsla av lugn och harmoni. Likaså den lilla kyrkogården. Jag rekommenderar kyrkans webbplats för mer information.
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