Drev Old Church

Braås, Sweden

The old church at Drev is built on a knoll amid an ancient landscape full of early remains. The church is the oldest preserved church in this province, dating from around 1170. There are traces of blocked-up doorways and windows in the walls. The men’s entrance was on the south side, the women’s on the north. the priest entered the chancel directly from the south.

The interior is richly decorated with paintings and carved wooden furnishings. The pews were built in 1669, the galleries in 1697 and the pulpit in 1702. The ceiling paintings by J.C. Zschotzsher from 1751 were paid for by the church’s patron, Benzelstierna, whose coat of arms can be seen on the choir ceiling. To the sides of the altar, the list of kings and the list of this diocese’s bishops respectively are painted.

The church was abandoned in 1868 when the new church was finished. It stood empty for 40 years before being restored to use.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1170
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Caroline Lekander (3 months ago)
Beautiful
romywebb se (3 years ago)
Sjösås old church is an interesting old church in a nice location in Braås towards the lake Örken. Beautiful wooden bell tower shows the place. Seems to be incredibly well preserved inside and tells old story. Small cemetery surrounds the church but at the back there is a large continuation of the area and and many cemeteries. Next to the church there is also a large parking lot.
Jan Carlsson (4 years ago)
Old nice church.
Stig-Gunnar Gummesson (4 years ago)
Nice old church
Sasa Rurac (4 years ago)
Super
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