There has been a manor house on the site of Keila-Joa manor (Schloss Fall) since the 17th century. The present manor house was built in 1831-1833 and designed by St. Petersburg architect Andrei Stackenschneider. The manor represents one of the earliest examples of neo-Gothic architecture in Estonia. It was built for the family of count Alexander von Benckendorff (whose graves can be found in the park adjacent to the manor) and the building saw many prominent guests during the Imperial years, among others the Russian royal family, famous soprano Henriette Sontag and composer Alexei Lvov.

From 1927 to 1940 it was used by the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. During the Soviet occupation it was used by the Red Army. The centre of the manor now belongs to the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but is not being used currently and is awaiting restoration. In 2010 the manor was sold into private hands.

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Details

Founded: 1831-1833
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Žilvinas P. (8 months ago)
This manor complex was built in 1833 in the neo-gothic style according to the designs of Hans von Stackenschneider, who would go on to become one of the key minds of the historicist style in Russia. The manor has an amazing location along a rocky river with rapids that run through the valley, a 6 m waterfall, and wonderful views of the surrounding countryside.
Salme Kulmar (12 months ago)
There are no information sheets under photos, paintings, almost in any rooms. Just nice furniture without any context.
Yerlan Akhmetov (12 months ago)
Nice castle! Wasn't able to get inside during my visit.
Andre põsinski (2 years ago)
Beautiful manor .. breathtaking
Leonid Malikov (2 years ago)
Absolutely spectacular place and a palace manor, both inside and outside. Better to visit during summer - or in the winter when everything is snowy
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