There has been a manor house on the site of Keila-Joa manor (Schloss Fall) since the 17th century. The present manor house was built in 1831-1833 and designed by St. Petersburg architect Andrei Stackenschneider. The manor represents one of the earliest examples of neo-Gothic architecture in Estonia. It was built for the family of count Alexander von Benckendorff (whose graves can be found in the park adjacent to the manor) and the building saw many prominent guests during the Imperial years, among others the Russian royal family, famous soprano Henriette Sontag and composer Alexei Lvov.

From 1927 to 1940 it was used by the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. During the Soviet occupation it was used by the Red Army. The centre of the manor now belongs to the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but is not being used currently and is awaiting restoration. In 2010 the manor was sold into private hands.

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Details

Founded: 1831-1833
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Asta Karčauskaitė (2 years ago)
Very nice and romantic place. Loved it.
Julija Meleštšenko (2 years ago)
Beautiful place for visiting Keila waterfall. Nice park to go for long walks. Great museum and exhibitions.
Aflatek (2 years ago)
I recommend :)
Margit Haabsaar (2 years ago)
This is so beautiful, dignified and perfect to make a day trip away of all confusion and lack of taste!
Liis Pitkänen (4 years ago)
Must visit manor in Estonia, near Tallinn with beautiful waterfall next to it. It is so neatly restored that it is actually a masterpiece. Dinner set was delicious and Sunday tea and piano concert perfect. Do take time to enjoy it and take lots of pictures! The owner has done an amazing work and contributed highly to the local area and whole Estonia with restoring this place. Do visit!
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