The history of Pirgu Mansion dates back to the 17th century. Earliest document is dated 1662 when mansion belonged to famous Estonian noble family -Ykskyll (Uexküll). Pirgu that was the wooden building back then had no substantial damages during North War (Põhjasõda), but was after this war sold to family Peez to whom it belonged over 100 years.

In 1819 Sir Gideon Von Sthal brought Pirgu for 90 000 silver roubles and started soon building of new presentable mansion-ensemble in place of an old wooden house. Demure in dimensions but still with a blaze of Hõreda in style there are similarities in proportions and shape. Exceptional attentiveness was shown to the park that has also influences from English Park. Park of Pirgu has been brought out as the park with most beautiful sights in Baltic States.

Elaborated are sights down the river; the sight of the lordly house opens on to road when one is on his way. Winding road leads along the coasts of the river through the contrastrly laid wood groups to the park square where the ensemble picture of pavilion, bridges and storehouses is seen. The tree sorts in park are interesting and rare. In this park you can also see the tallest nut tree in the Baltic States. About 250 different species of plants have been found in 10-hectare park. The park is under nature protection and manor house is under architectural protection.

The life in mansion had high times during the thirties of 19th century. It was followed by many changes in ownership in 1847 family of Wulffsdorff, in 1887 J.V. Hagemeister etc. And before the house was ruined to foundations in World War I the owner was Gessy Von Wetter-Rosenthal. Nowadays owner is Ruth - Kaja Pekk. House and the park were rebuilt from the ruins from 1984 to 1987 using the old drawings and pictures so today it is mainly the same as it used to be.

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Juuru-Pirgu, Pirgu, Estonia
See all sites in Pirgu

Details

Founded: 1820s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

pirgu.eu
www.manor.ee

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