Ravila (Mecks) was first referred to as a the location of a manor in 1469. A later baroque building was burned down during the revolt of 1905, and only the grand granite stairs facing the park survives from that building. It was rebuilt shortly afterwards, but smaller and in a neo-Baroque style. It was the home of writer Peter August Friedrich von Manteuffel.

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Address

Ravila tee 21, Kose, Estonia
See all sites in Kose

Details

Founded: restored 1905
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arno Kaerama (2 years ago)
Ilusti taastatud
Markku Sohlman (2 years ago)
Sisältä huippuhieno paikka, vaikka ulkoapäin sitä ei uskoisi.
Max Lauter (2 years ago)
Lovely place for summer plays :).
Michael Randrup Christensen (2 years ago)
If you just need a place to sleep and a bath it fine. The building really need repairs all over... Don’t go for the food or to meet other people - nobody’s here only the staff (one guy in a white suit
Ravila Kaslane (2 years ago)
Olen saatuse tahtel olnud seal 30 a , ning hakkasin seal kirjutama. Ravila mõisas on huvitav ajalugu, ning kõige kuulsam krahv Peter Friedrich Von Mannteuffel elas sel, kes kirjutas Eesti kirjanduse ajalukku ennast. Ravila mõis on nüüd erakätes, kus saab ööbita ja pidusid või üritusi teha. 3, 5 km kaugusel asub Eesti kõige vanem kivikirik Kose kirik esmamainime 1231a
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