Riisipere manor (Neu-Riesenberg) traces its origins as an estate to 1394. It has been owned by various well-known Baltic German families over the centuries. The present building was erected in 1818-1821 during the ownership of Peter von Stackelberg. The grandiose building is one of the finest examples in Estonia of Neoclassical manor house architecture. The front façade is dominated by a six-column portico with a trunctated ornamental gable and two three-storeyed side projections. The interior displays an enfilade of representative premises, including a cupola hall, unique in Estonia, and a richly decorated hypostyle white hall, abundant with details in stucco. The manor is set in a park with an artificial lake.

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Details

Founded: 1818-1821
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markku Tarkiainen (3 months ago)
Nothing to see, the areal is blocked .fi visitors.
Mario Org (3 months ago)
Its sill being renovated in 2020
Henry Mark Esop (7 months ago)
as of 11/04/2020: impossible to enter - all fenced, cameras recording. :(
Toomas Välja (10 months ago)
It's fenced off and there's no access to it as in the past. The building is being renovated, though and is one of the largest manors I've seen in Estonia, if not the largest.
Martin Väli (13 months ago)
Estonian most haunted MANOR
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