Riisipere manor (Neu-Riesenberg) traces its origins as an estate to 1394. It has been owned by various well-known Baltic German families over the centuries. The present building was erected in 1818-1821 during the ownership of Peter von Stackelberg. The grandiose building is one of the finest examples in Estonia of Neoclassical manor house architecture. The front façade is dominated by a six-column portico with a trunctated ornamental gable and two three-storeyed side projections. The interior displays an enfilade of representative premises, including a cupola hall, unique in Estonia, and a richly decorated hypostyle white hall, abundant with details in stucco. The manor is set in a park with an artificial lake.

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Details

Founded: 1818-1821
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Ojasalu (10 months ago)
Impressive look! Road is cutting the view. Great history, good to see renovations there.
Kairi Õunapuu (11 months ago)
Väljaspoolt väga ilus vaadata juba, renoveerimisel hetkel.
Sergei (11 months ago)
Big manor under renovation. Territory is closed and nothing to see outside. Should be worth visiting in some years.
Larissa Sarman (13 months ago)
Место для отдыха и прогулок.
Arvi Tammuru (14 months ago)
Restaureerimisel Eestis üks ilusamaid mõisu,kus olen lapsepõlves elanud,mõisa ärklikorrusel,1.5 aastat.
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