In 1626, Saka (Sackhof) was given as an estate by the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus to the alderman of Narva Jürgen Leslie of Aberdeen, whose origins were Scottish but who had probably entered Swedish service during the time of the Thirty Years War. The estate later passed into Baltic German von Löwis of Menar family, and the current building was erected during the ownership of Oscar von Löwis of Menar, in 1862-1864. It was built in an accomplished Italian renaissance style, unusual for Estonian manor houses.

During the Soviet occupation of Estonia, the manor was used by Soviet military forces. During this time the manor and the park fell into disrepair. It was abandoned, looted and left in ruins after their departure, but has later been restored. Today the manor offers accommodation.

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Address

Voorepera-Saka, Aa, Estonia
See all sites in Aa

Details

Founded: 1862-1864
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

www.saka.ee
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nicolas Saunier (18 months ago)
You will get what you paid for not less not more.
Veljo K. (18 months ago)
After a 8 year, still I can recommend that place for you!
Anna Petrushina (2 years ago)
Nice place to spend weekend. Good SPA and restaurant.
Hele-Riin Kutsar (2 years ago)
Best service in hotel reception, beautiful nature - stairs down to the beach, very romantic walk. Tasty and high class food in restaurant. Nice small spa with saunas and pool and different services.
Ian Winstanley (2 years ago)
Wonderful to relax. Epic view of sunset with panoramic setting. Superb dinner, compliments to the chef. And a fantastic 1.5 hours private use of sauna and pool included in romantic package. Would be excellent place for wedding.
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