Purtse Castle Manor

Lüganuse, Estonia

Purtse vassal castle manor was built by Jakob von Taube in 1533, as a mixture between a defensive structure and a residential manor. Such structures were not built as strategic fortresses in case of war but rather as dwellings that provided protection against uprisings by Estonian peasants and provided a stronghold from which to control the surrounding area.

Purtse remained in the possession of the Taubes until 1615. After that, ownership of the manor transferred to Heinrich Fleming, who belonged to the peerage of Sweden. The party hall of the stronghold was decorated with colourful tiled stoves and baroque leather wallpaper. Purtse vassal stronghold has been burnt down and rebuilt several times throughout its history. The building suffered particularly badly during the Livonian War and the Great Northern War. The tower and defence floor of the building were destroyed in the Great Northern War (1700-1710).

The building has had many functions during its existence. It has been the home of a feudal family, offered protection in times of war and in later times it has served as a cold cellar, milk chamber, grain storage, a prison and a workers' residence.

The castle was left in ruins in the 1950s and restored from 1987 to 1990. Today it is open to the public from May to September. The castle popular venue for weddings and events.

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Details

Founded: 1533
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andres Noormagi (2 years ago)
Unique historical place, good brewery
George On tour (2 years ago)
Historically known as Isenheim or Alt-Isenheim, the fortress residence was built in an interesting era: the retreat of late Gothic style and the dawn of Renaissance. Therefore, the peculiarities of both style, skilfully fused, are evident. In ancient times the mouth of the River Purtse was one of the most densely populated areas in Eastern Estonia. The need for active military protection increased after the christianization of the country by the Danish at the beginning of the 13th century. Even the first stone churches in Lüganuse and Jõhvi were insured against military attacks. The vassal stronghold of Purtse was built quite lately, at the time of JAKOB VON TAUBE (TUVE), in 1533. Purtse stayed in hands of von Taubes until 1615. Then the manor property went further to HEINRICH FLEMING, a member of Swedish high peerage. The festive hall of the castle was decorated with colourful tile stoves and baroc leather wallpaper.
Rait Rosenberg (2 years ago)
Beautiful, makes you wonder how it used to be.
Evgeny Goroshko (2 years ago)
Was closed when we visited Purtse, but looks cool.
Minna Laiho (2 years ago)
Hoast told us lots about the area, foods and local cider crafting. Local food, gorgeus place!
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