Jõhvi Church

Jõhvi, Estonia

The church of St. Michael (Mihkli) was built in the mid-15th century and it is the biggest one-nave church in Estonia. It was originally constructed as a fortress church; two meter thick walls, narrow windows and the surrounding moat made it easy to defend. The church has been damaged in wars and restored several times.

The unique detail of the Jõhvi church is a great vaulted cellar, which is today renovated as a chapel and museum.

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Address

Rakvere 6b, Jõhvi, Estonia
See all sites in Jõhvi

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Taavi Tamberg (3 years ago)
A beautiful church, a kind family, the museum cellar is being renovated, you can call in advance.
Priit Pulver (3 years ago)
Church like church always
The Mku (4 years ago)
Fortress Church of St. Michael in Jõhvi centre is the oldest building in the town. It is believed to be built in the middle of the 13th century — modest and impressive building with excellent acoustics when they play the organ.
Nikita Sergejev (4 years ago)
Beautiful church
Philip Johnston (5 years ago)
Outside looks very nice but door was locked so couldn't go inside.
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