Villa Ammende is one of the best examples of early art nouveau style in Estonia. The grand villa with a large garden was built in 1905 and belonged to the Ammende merchant family. The façades and interiors of the house were abundant, rich in detail and diverse, but also very stylish. The family went bankrupt after the First World War and the villa was sold to Pärnu City. The house has been used as a summer casino and a club. The villa has now been restored and turned into a luxurious hotel and restaurant, and it looks more stylish and art nouveau than even before. Concerts and art exhibitions are often held in the villa and guests can also enjoy its beautiful green garden.

Reference: Visit Pärnu

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Details

Founded: 1905
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jarppe Länsiö (14 months ago)
Beautiful hotel near the beach and city centre. The staff is extremely nice, I'd give them six stars if possible. As a bonus there's a charging point for EV's.
Béla Tóth (16 months ago)
Beautiful place. Very helpfull and kind service.
D F (Fintech Accountability) (2 years ago)
Attended the Paul Neimšov concert here. The venue was so lovely and intricate. Seemed like wonderful hosts for events. I did not stay in the hotel or eat, as an FYI.
Priit Kallas (2 years ago)
Villa Ammende restaurant was a pleasant surprise. Quiet atmosphere and interesting tasting menu. The service was nice, and you should visit it even if you don’t stay in the hotel.
Priit Kallas (2 years ago)
Villa Ammende restaurant was a pleasant surprise. Quiet atmosphere and interesting tasting menu. The service was nice, and you should visit it even if you don’t stay in the hotel.
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