Villa Ammende is one of the best examples of early art nouveau style in Estonia. The grand villa with a large garden was built in 1905 and belonged to the Ammende merchant family. The façades and interiors of the house were abundant, rich in detail and diverse, but also very stylish. The family went bankrupt after the First World War and the villa was sold to Pärnu City. The house has been used as a summer casino and a club. The villa has now been restored and turned into a luxurious hotel and restaurant, and it looks more stylish and art nouveau than even before. Concerts and art exhibitions are often held in the villa and guests can also enjoy its beautiful green garden.

Reference: Visit Pärnu

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Details

Founded: 1905
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Priit Kallas (10 months ago)
Villa Ammende restaurant was a pleasant surprise. Quiet atmosphere and interesting tasting menu. The service was nice, and you should visit it even if you don’t stay in the hotel.
Jevgeni Listsina (11 months ago)
Charming place with true fine dining restaurant. Always nice retreat in high or low season. Outstanding breakfast (a la card options), one of the best in Pärnu, compared to best ones offered in european grand hotels.
Kristjan Kanarik (11 months ago)
Sandwiches at five o'clock tea were dry and seemed like taken out of gas station sandwich triangles with "today" as best before date. Everything else top notch.
Peter Korhonen (14 months ago)
The best restaurant in town
Real K3sa (14 months ago)
Everything is amazing, but the rooms feel a bit empty and the age of the building hits hard.
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