Pärnu Kuursaal

Pärnu, Estonia

Built in the 1880s, Kuursaal (Casino), a restaurant and musical salon, has always been an important centre of Pärnu's resort life. In summer evenings, most events have taken place outside, around the outdoor stage.

The outdoor stage, designed by the city architect O. Siinmaa in 1936, was an elegant interpretation of Pärnu's "resort functionalism" in wood. As a result of the renovations carried out in 1980s, it unfortunately lost a lot of its former elegance.

Today, you can enjoy music and dance nights to complement your dinner here, in the largest pub in Estonia; beach sounds on the terraces in the summer, and music as beautiful as ever at the outdoor stage.

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Details

Founded: 1880's
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tõnis Janno (3 years ago)
Good place where to be fiends
Mark Loit (3 years ago)
perfect place for a good vibe beer drinking evening
Jaak Ginter (3 years ago)
We waited over an hour with no warnings that it's going to be long. We just left, maybe it would have taken 2 hours or more.
Jukka Vainionpää (4 years ago)
We was here many times in last years and it was the best. Now something is changed, maybe owner. Menu was cut in half etc.
Marko Kruusimagi (4 years ago)
Really slow service and salty food. Its like eating in the basement. Really dark. Good thing is alcohol tastes better when you're hungry.
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