Pärnu Kuursaal

Pärnu, Estonia

Built in the 1880s, Kuursaal (Casino), a restaurant and musical salon, has always been an important centre of Pärnu's resort life. In summer evenings, most events have taken place outside, around the outdoor stage.

The outdoor stage, designed by the city architect O. Siinmaa in 1936, was an elegant interpretation of Pärnu's "resort functionalism" in wood. As a result of the renovations carried out in 1980s, it unfortunately lost a lot of its former elegance.

Today, you can enjoy music and dance nights to complement your dinner here, in the largest pub in Estonia; beach sounds on the terraces in the summer, and music as beautiful as ever at the outdoor stage.

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Details

Founded: 1880's
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hugo Pruul (15 months ago)
Cheapest drinks near the beach but if you want to eat then the service is really slow. We had to wait 25+ minutes just to give our order. People who came before us could ordere earlier.
Toomas Sööt (2 years ago)
Loong wait bad not gud
Vlad Rubc (2 years ago)
It took more than 1hr to bring onion rings and then it turned out that there was a mix up and I’m not getting my main dish. After 1 HOUR! Had to eat my friend’a food, which wasn’t tasty at all. Waiters looked 16 y.o. and didn’t seem to care about anything. Surprised to find such a bad place in the middle of Pärnu.
that one guy from there (3 years ago)
Enough places to sit down after hitting the dance floor?
Peter zu putlitz (3 years ago)
Waited för 1/2 hour and noone take an order.i ask 3 Times and get totaly ignored..absolutly lousy service...Walker away..
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