Vasalemma (Wassalem) estate was founded in 1825 and in 1890-93 the present manor house was erected by Baltic German landowner Eduard von Baggehufwudt. The architect was Konstantin Wilcken, who designed the house in a bare limestone neo-Gothic style. Several interior details have survived from this period, such as wainscoting, coffered ceilings and pig-iron ovens. Today it houses a school.

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Details

Founded: 1890-1893
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kārlis Glūdiņš (3 years ago)
Neliela muiža - skola , kura uzbūvēta no Ruumu karjērā iegūtā akmens - marmora
Peter Kock (3 years ago)
Mooi landhuis. Leuk voor een korte stop. Het is niet geopend voor bezoekers.
Ivan Kutchin (3 years ago)
Довольно интересное здание, построенное в конце 19 века в английском стиле. Здесь проходили съемки советского детектива "Тайна черных дроздов". Сейчас в мызе располагается школа, внутрь для посетителей доступа нет, можно погулять по парку и осмотреть здание снаружи.
Ieva Glūdiņa (3 years ago)
Skaista, sakopta vieta, pieejami lieliski veloceliņi, apkārtnē daudz karjera ezeru, kuru uzmanro mototriālam.
Jüri Kaljundi (4 years ago)
Good for quick stroll or a photo opportunity in the park.
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