Russalka Memorial

Tallinn, Estonia

The Russalka Memorial is a bronze monument sculpted by Amandus Adamson, erected on 7 September 1902 in Kadriorg, Tallinn, to mark the ninth anniversary of the sinking of the Russian warship Rusalka, or Mermaid, which sank en route to Finland in 1893. The monument depicts an angel holding an Orthodox cross towards the assumed direction of the shipwreck. The model for the angel was the sculptor's housekeeper Juliana Rootsi, whose grandson is the politician Tiit Made.

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Address

Pirita tee, Tallinn, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1902
Category: Statues in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mario Org (15 months ago)
Nice views and nice area to relax and look at the sea
Grace DeLasFuentesS (16 months ago)
Nice spot and really good view to the Tallinn Bay
Alexander Bauer (16 months ago)
great monument to remember the sinking of the russalka ship.
Alex Herregud (17 months ago)
Very nice park indeed!
Mattias Sillaste (17 months ago)
Very peaceful and beautiful view and a very nice place where you could ride with your skateboard or bike etc.
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