Westerplatte is a long peninsula at the entrance to the harbour. When Gdańsk became a free city after WWI, Poland was permitted to maintain a post at this location, at the tip of the port zone. It served both trading and military purposes and had a garrison to protect it. WWII broke out here at dawn on 1 September 1939, when the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein began shelling the Polish guard post. The garrison, which numbered just 182 men, held out for seven days before surrendering.

The site is now a memorial, with some of the ruins left as they were after the bombardment, plus a massive monument put up in memory of the defenders.

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Founded: 1966
Category: Statues in Poland

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcin Majewski (2 years ago)
This is a most amazing place with really large pieces to show Polish and Worldwide History. On the past ( like 2002 ) there was nothing. Just small museum. But now? You can see all of them from our history. Nice place to visit, nice place to learn, nice place to explore, nice place to fight!
James Turner (2 years ago)
A very moving and fitting monument, and an excellent view of Gdansk too. Well worth a visit, but take your coat in the winter!
Stefan Håkansson (2 years ago)
The Second World War started on the Westerplatte where a Polish garrison bravely fought the German intruders. The remainings of Polish bunkers damaged by heavy shells can still be visited. Furthermore, there are many informative signs telling the story of what happened back in 1939.
Natalia Rusek (2 years ago)
In winter very bad as its cold no restaurant, no toilet. Very poor public access.
youtube alias (2 years ago)
Interesting place to visit near the sea, it goes quickly to see the monument so I recommend you be open to explore on your own too. The toilets are not fun to use and one of them you have to pay for also stinks, its not a "fancy" place at all so be prepared for a hard/rough feeling here. But it's a important place you should see and if you choose the boat back to Gdansk be prepare that it takes a while ..
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