Archaeological Museum

Gdańsk, Poland

The Archaeological museum is situated in a complex of buildings by the Motława River. It contains an extensive collection describing the Polish cultural and ethnic roots of the region.

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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oliwia Biros (2 years ago)
The Archaeological Museum is located in an impressive 16th century tenement house on the waterfront. It houses permanent exhibitions devoted mostly to the prehistory of Pomerania. The majority of exhibits have some English explanations but sadly not all of them. The observation tower offers stunning views of the city.
Ken Ho (3 years ago)
Not sure why I bothered to visit this museum. Its prime location does not reflect the quality of its collection or exhibits. There were more staff than visitors when I visited. The most interesting parts were the displays on archaeological finds from the Gdansk area; the displays of cultures from around the world were rather cringeworthy.
Marko Kohvakka (3 years ago)
Great and clear exhibitions. Only minus for no english explanations.
Mika Martiskainen (3 years ago)
Bit small, but intresting collection. About half of the items has description text only in polish.
Pawel Pacholec (4 years ago)
Fantastic panoramic view of the Old Town from the Museum's Tower
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Antiquarium

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These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).