Neptune's Fountain

Gdańsk, Poland

Neptune's Fountain, in the center of Dlugi Targ has grown to be one of Gdansk's most recognizable symbols. The bronze statue of the Roman god of the sea was first erected in 1549, before being aptly made into a fountain in 1633. Like the city he represents, Neptune has had a storied history, himself - dismantled and hidden during World War II, old Neptune didn't come out of hiding until 1954 when he was restored to his rightful place in the heart of the city, reminding us of Gdansk's relationship to the sea.

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Founded: 1633
Category: Statues in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michał Radowski (5 months ago)
One of the most important spot in Gdansk. Must see for all turists but also a nice place for walk for locals.
Mirek Zabski (5 months ago)
According to Roman mythology, Neptune was the king of the seas and oceans. He managed a large kingdom of the water. Neptune was a just ruler who supported sailors. However, when he got angry, he was throwing bolts of lightning. I saw many monuments dedicated to Neptune in different places on our planet. In my honest opinion, Neptune's fountain (monument) in Gdańsk is the most beautiful amongst all. Created by the great Baroque architect Abraham van den Blocke. The fountain was executed in brass and open for the public in 1633. Weight 1433 lb. In the XVII century, a tank of water located on the nearest house roof supplied the fountain a proper water pressure. Since an electric era set in, a water tank was removed and the induction motor starts supply water pressure. I admired that artistic work in September 2015.
vanessa LIO (8 months ago)
Most stunning street corner in the old town Gdańsk, totally breath taking with its history & brillant architectures. You won’t miss it if you visit this city. Highly recommend to visit the old town in an early morning before the crowds arrive. Close to the Fontaine 200 meters further you can taste the yummy local ice cream Lody, totally a must try.
MrJsquires86 (8 months ago)
Amazing fountain. Especially beautiful at night. Many café and restaurants near by and the whole area buzzing. Highly recommend!
Paweł Gąsior (8 months ago)
Obligatory place when you visit Gdansk.
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