Neptune's Fountain

Gdańsk, Poland

Neptune's Fountain, in the center of Dlugi Targ has grown to be one of Gdansk's most recognizable symbols. The bronze statue of the Roman god of the sea was first erected in 1549, before being aptly made into a fountain in 1633. Like the city he represents, Neptune has had a storied history, himself - dismantled and hidden during World War II, old Neptune didn't come out of hiding until 1954 when he was restored to his rightful place in the heart of the city, reminding us of Gdansk's relationship to the sea.

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Details

Founded: 1633
Category: Statues in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bam 2 (2 years ago)
Fountain is situated at a good place, however, the fountain itself was not decorated in christmas 2018.
Oliwia Biros (2 years ago)
Most recognizable historic landmark in Gdansk and famous meeting point. The Neptune Fountain is a bronze statue of the sea god. The fountain is located in the center of the Long Market and right in front of the Artus Court. It was built in the 17th century.
David Wilding (2 years ago)
A essential part of Gdańsk! I love all of the city, and this is really good! Go see the city - not just Neptune!
S.s S.s (2 years ago)
Beautiful square, especially at night. The buildings are beautiful and colorful. Even here the restaurants are very cheap, there are often concerts, where sometimes you can watch for free (I was lucky ahaha). In the day it is also beautiful, in fact, there is less mess because people still sleep. The Neptuna Fountain "both in the evening and during the day" is wonderful "when they do not wear a shirt". Another very beautiful fountain is that of the lions, where small water games take place. I recommend visiting the place.
Les B (2 years ago)
Beautiful fountain featuring Neptune. Located on the main street of Old Town Gdansk, its very easy to find. Its a busy street with plenty of tourists so mind the usual negatives of high bustling areas. Don't loose your head and keep an eye on your belongings.
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