Guardhouse No 1

Gdańsk, Poland

WWII broke out here at dawn on 1 September 1939, when the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein began shelling the Polish guard post. The garrison, which numbered just 182 men, held out for seven days before surrendering. The site is now a memorial, with some of the ruins left as they were after the bombardment. The surviving Guardhouse No 1 houses a small exhibition related to the event, including a model of the battle labelled in English.

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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomasz Jan O. (52 days ago)
Budynek wartowni nr 1 obecnie mieści kameralną wystawę muzealną na temat Westerplatte. Warto odwiedzić i zapoznać się z kontentem, również to taki jeden z pierwszych punktów spaceru po Westerplatte.
krzysztof wlodarczyk (2 months ago)
Wstyd się przyznać że na Westerplatte wcześniej nie byłem, wycieczka szkolna jakoś ominęła,a potem mimo że nie raz byłem w Gdańsku nie odwiedziłem. Może dlatego że myślałem że jest to całkiem gdzieś indziej ale to zupełnie w innym miejscu. CAŁKOWICIE inaczej wyobrażałam sobie to miejsce,plan sytuacyjny 1 września ,sytuację żołnierzy,itd. Nie mogłem usnąć.
Anna Maria Piotrowska (4 months ago)
Kameralna wystawa ale treściwa, umieszczona w wyjątkowym budynku z czasów wojskowej składnicy tranzytowej, o bogatej historii. Każdy powinien tam wejść
Lars Olofsson (6 months ago)
Small museum but good. 15 minutes is enough.
Joanna Kapica (2 years ago)
For Polish history this is very important spot. Good and interesting quick history lesson. Stuff at the place is very supportive and we'll informed.
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