Guardhouse No 1

Gdańsk, Poland

WWII broke out here at dawn on 1 September 1939, when the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein began shelling the Polish guard post. The garrison, which numbered just 182 men, held out for seven days before surrendering. The site is now a memorial, with some of the ruins left as they were after the bombardment. The surviving Guardhouse No 1 houses a small exhibition related to the event, including a model of the battle labelled in English.

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Category: Museums in Poland

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Ihsan Abdul Halim (3 years ago)
Ok
Ihsan Abdul Halim (3 years ago)
Ok
Rita Poon (3 years ago)
I visited this little museum today to learn more about how approximately 220 Polish soldiers held off more than 2000 Nazi German soldiers for 7 days with much less and inferior weapons. The lady staff at the museum told me a lot about the exhibitions such as how big the German bullets were compared to the Polish ones. We had talked for a long time about the battle and how things are now. It’s an excellent experience. Kudos to the lady whom I have no idea what her name is but I really appreciate your time in helping me. Dziękuję!!
R P (3 years ago)
I visited this little museum today to learn more about how approximately 220 Polish soldiers held off more than 2000 Nazi German soldiers for 7 days with much less and inferior weapons. The lady staff at the museum told me a lot about the exhibitions such as how big the German bullets were compared to the Polish ones. We had talked for a long time about the battle and how things are now. It’s an excellent experience. Kudos to the lady whom I have no idea what her name is but I really appreciate your time in helping me. Dziękuję!!
R P (3 years ago)
I visited this little museum today to learn more about how approximately 220 Polish soldiers held off more than 2000 Nazi German soldiers for 7 days with much less and inferior weapons. The lady staff at the museum told me a lot about the exhibitions such as how big the German bullets were compared to the Polish ones. We had talked for a long time about the battle and how things are now. It’s an excellent experience. Kudos to the lady whom I have no idea what her name is but I really appreciate your time in helping me. Dziękuję!!
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