Balga was a medieval castle of the Teutonic Knights. The hill of Balga had been the site of an Old Prussian (Warmian) fortress called Honeda, that had been unsuccessfully besieged by the Wettin margrave Henry III of Meissen on his 1237 Prussian Crusade. It was conquered in 1239 by the forces of the Teutonic Order, led by Grand Marshal Dietrich von Bernheim.

The oldest Ordensburg constructed by the Teutonic Order was built from 1239 to control naval traffic on the Vistula Lagoon. With the assistance of Duke Otto I of Brunswick-Lüneburg, the Knights defeated the Old Prussians along the coastline of Warmia and Natangia. The subjugation of these pagans led Duke Świętopełk II of Pomerania to declare war against the Order during the 1242 Prussian uprising, although he was forced to acquiesce. From 1250 Balga was the administrative centre of Kommende Balga and the seat of a Komtur of the Teutonic Knights. Many Komturs at Balga like Winrich von Kniprode or Ulrich von Jungingen later rose to the office of the Grand Master.

In 1499 Grand Master Friedrich von Sachsen had the commandery dissolved. Upon the Prussian Homage, Balga was part of the Polish Duchy of Prussia in 1525 and the castle became the residence of George of Polentz, Bishop of Samland. From 1627, parts of the castle were broken down at the behest of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden during the Polish–Swedish War in order to gain building material for the construction of the Baltiysk (Pillau) fortress.

Balga was also the name of the nearby village, after 1945 renamed Vesyoloye, which is now abandoned. Until the end of World War II Balga was in the former German Province of East Prussia; it was the site of one of the final battles of the Wehrmacht with advancing Red Army forces during the East Prussian Offensive, which devastated the castle remains.

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Founded: 1239
Category: Ruins in Russia

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Роман Оглов (3 months ago)
Very atmospheric place
Mikhail Taymanov (4 months ago)
The lock is closed, there is a guard. Vegetation hides it from sight.
ирина темирханян (6 months ago)
So. 1. everything is surrounded by a rope, but everyone dives under it; 2. The feeling near the ruins is so grotesque or something 3. Wind. You must definitely feel this wind. I didn't feel anything like that. All in all, worth a visit. Only the road for 3 minus.
Галина Куратова (12 months ago)
A wonderful atmospheric place worth visiting. Moreover, Balga is one of the most famous monuments of medieval knightly architecture. It is unfortunate that little is left of the former greatness, time and people have very battered the castle. To visit in the summer, I advise you to take with you more money from mosquitoes, they’re terrifying what they are starving. I also advise you to check the technical condition of the car. At our car, from shaking along the knight's block, the contact to the engine fan broke, I had to repair it in the field)))
Alex AG (3 years ago)
Первое что важно знать об этом месте, что 7 км от трассы, не самая хорошая дорога, но та красота, стоит данной неприятности. Конечно осталось мало чего от стен замка. Место же выбрали для него прекрасное и прогуляться в тишине, подышать морским воздухом. И не смотря на наличие охраны, вход на территорию бесплатный.
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