Pieniezno Castle Ruins

Pieniężno, Poland

During the Middle Ages, an Old Prussian fort called Malcekuke was located near the current site of Pieniężno. The Teutonic Knights built an Ordensburg castle near Malcekuke in 1302. Both the castle and the town which developed nearby were destroyed during the war between the Teutonic Order and the Kingdom of Poland in 1414. During the Thirteen Years' War, Mehlsack surrendered to the Order, and the castle burned down during Poland's recapture of the town. From 1589-1599, Prince Andrew Cardinal Báthory of Transylvania, cousin of Sigismund Báthory, was the administrator for the castle. In 1550, the Prussian army laid siege to the city and partially burned it down.

The town was captured by Swedish troops in 1626 during the Polish-Swedish War of 1625-29, recovered by Hetman Stanisław Rewera Potocki, and then had its castle partially destroyed by Swedish troops in 1627. The castle was restored in 1640 with Baroque gables, and its function changed from being a fortress to being a château.

During the 19th and 20th centuries the castle lost some of its Gothic and Baroque features, and in 1870 its eastern and southern wings were demolished after extensive deterioration. The remainder of the castle was used as administrative offices for Prussianofficials. From 1920-31 the western wing was renovated so the castle could be used as a school and museum. In 1945, Mehlsack, including its castle, was 90% destroyed by fighting during World War II and was conquered by the Soviet Red Army from Nazi Germany.

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Details

Founded: 1302
Category: Ruins in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marek Lacki (8 months ago)
Not available to visitors. Forgotten ruin, devoid of care, decaying.
Leszek Kaminski (2 years ago)
A great place to rebuild and renovate.
czarrna86 (2 years ago)
Only a sad ruin of a 13th-century gothic bishop's castle remained in Pieniężno. It was partially demolished in the 19th century. In the center of the village in a similar condition the town hall erected in the second half of the fourteenth century. Only a well-kept church ...
Sławek Woźnica (2 years ago)
At present, the ruins are fenced and inaccessible.
Grzegorz Sosnowski (2 years ago)
The amazing castle of the Warmia chapter is a pity that it fell into such a ruin. Closed but you can enter through a hole in the fence near the church and see it closely, a large, powerful castle
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