Juditten Church is an originally Roman Catholic, later Protestant, and currently Russian Orthodox church in the Mendeleyevo district of Kaliningrad. Juditten was the name of Mendeleyevo when it was a quarter of Königsberg, Germany. One of the oldest churches of Sambia, the fortified church of was built in the Catholic state of the Teutonic Order between 1276 and 1294-1298 or c. 1287-1288. In 1402 it was mentioned in the treasurer's book as Judynkirchen. Frescoes by the painter Peter were located in the chancel by 1394. It received a free-standing tower ca. 1400, a crucifix c. 1520, and a weather vane in 1577. The clock tower and nave were connected by a barrel-vaulted vestibule in 1820.

Juditten became a shrine to the Virgin Mary and a medieval Christian pilgrimage site for visitors from throughout the Holy Roman Empire, especially during the era of Grand Master Konrad von Jungingen. The church's frescoes depicted coats of arms (such as those of Grand Master Ulrich von Jungingen, the lives of Jesus and Mary, the Twelve Apostles, chivalric stories, and legendary creatures. Its large Madonna and Child above a crescent moon was made out of colored wood by an unknown master before 1454. According to Friedrich Lahrs, the Madonna had previously been located in Königsberg Cathedral's chapel. Its pearls were stolen from its crown by Königsberg rebels in 1454 during the Thirteen Years' War, with the Teutonic Knights replacing them in 1504 and moving the art to the pilgrimage site Juditten in 1504. The church was converted from Catholicism to Lutheranism in 1526 following the establishment of the Duchy of Prussia the previous year; pilgrimages were allowed to continue despite the Protestant Reformation. It also contained a cathedra from 1686, a Baroque altar, and an organ from 1840.

The church included epitaphs and portraits of field marshals Erhard Ernst von Röder and Hans von Lehwaldt by the Königsberg artist E. A. Knopke; both Röder and Lehwaldt were successively married to a daughter of Wilhelm Dietrich von Buddenbrock. Johann Christoph Gottsched was born in the church's rectory in 1700. Stanislaus Cauer was buried in the church's cemetery.

Although the church was largely undamaged by fighting during World War II, it was plundered in April 1945, when it passed from German to Russian control. Services continued until 1948. It was neglected until the 1970s, with the roof and part of the walls collapsing in the 1960s. It was reconsecrated in October 1985 as a Russian Orthodox church and was eventually restored to serve as the main church of St. Nicholas Orthodox Convent.

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Founded: 1276-1298
Category: Religious sites in Russia

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Никита Качанов (3 months ago)
Recently he repented of his sins, a good monastery! Father Zhmyshenko made me especially happy, did a good job with a censer and forgave all sins. I was surprised by the presence of pits, which the father kindly shared with me, although the taste was strange, but the father assured that everything is fine, they say, these are special appendages. I recommend to everyone!
Ирина Миронова (4 months ago)
A prayerful place, but for some reason the magpie is 250 rubles. In Chernyakhovsk they ordered 140
Светлана Бочкова (4 months ago)
Temple in the Gothic style. Everything is saved. In the monastery shop you can buy wonderful butter and sour cream.
Maxim Zabolosky (5 months ago)
This place is a must-see when visiting Kaliningrad. This is the oldest building in the city. Built back in the days of the Teutonic Knights. The interior is also impressive. Nearby there is a mass grave of Soviet soldiers, as well as a German cemetery.
Александр Мишенин (14 months ago)
St. Nicholas Cathedral (German Kirche von Juditten) is considered the oldest building (XIII century) in the city of Kaliningrad from the surviving to this day. The temple was erected in the Gothic style, the first mention in 1288, is known as the oldest Gothic building in the whole Kaliningrad region and the only purely Gothic architectural monument (church, church - religious building) of this area *. The Teutonic Order built this temple. At first it was Catholic (until the 16th century), then Lutheran (until 1948), and finally, it became the first Orthodox church (in 1985) for 40 years of Russian history in this region, and later (in 1999) - the main church of the first Orthodox monastery in the Kaliningrad land.
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