Carlsten is a stone fortress built on the orders of King Carl X of Sweden following the Treaty of Roskilde, 1658 to protect the newly acquired province of Bohuslän from hostile attacks. The site of Marstrand was chosen because of its location and its access to an ice free port. Initially a square stone tower was constructed, but by 1680 it was reconstructed and replaced by a round shaped tower. Successive additions to the fortress were carried out, by the inmates sentenced to hard labour, until 1860 when it was reported finished. The fortress was decommissioned as a permanent defense installation in 1882, but remained in military use until the early 1990s.

The fortress was attacked and sieged twice falling into enemy hands. In 1677 it was conquered by Ulrik Frederick Gyldenløve, the Danish military commander in Norway and in 1719 by the Norwegian Vice-Admiral Tordenskjold. At both occasions the fortress was returned to Swedish control through negotiations and treaties.

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Details

Founded: 1658
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders Nilsson (2 months ago)
Really nice for Christmas parties (julbord). Like 7+ dishes for vegetarians.
Bauer (2 months ago)
Perfect place for a Christmas getaway! Lovely surroundings!
Lise Galuga (5 months ago)
A windy visit to a lovely fortress. We did some geocaching along the outer walls... You can find this cache without having to pay the admission fee. The visit was self guided and inexpensive. They offer a discount for military members, but you must ask for it and show identification. The views of the archipelago from the top are worth the climb! There is also a waffle cafe here which offers light salads and sandwiches.
Goran Nidogon (5 months ago)
Nice place to spent Weekend in peace. Great wiew, excellent for a walking & riding bike.
A Marco (9 months ago)
We ended up at this place almost accidentally, but it was the most amazing part of the trip. The island is beautiful and quaint, but the fortress is something to behold. Staying overnight at the Soldat Inn gives you a kind of back stage pass to explore on your own. We easily explored rooms and tunnels for two hours. Plus the surrounding town and trails have beautiful vistas in every direction. This is great for families or couples. Something for everyone. Affordable rooms. Don't miss it.
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