Gothenburg Museum of Art

Gothenburg, Sweden

The Göteborg Museum of Art at Götaplatsen, Gothenburg, is renowned for its collection of Nordic art from around the close of the 19th century. A must see is the lavishly decorated Fürstenberg Gallery, named after a leading Gothenburg art donor, Pontus Fürstenberg and his wife Göthilda. Among the artists showcased one can mention Carl Larsson, Anders Zorn, and P.S. Kröyer.

The museum also houses older and contemporary art, both Nordic and international. The Museum has been awarded three stars in the Michelin Guide (Green Guide Scandinavia).

The museum building was created for the international exhibition in Gothenburg 1923 by architect Sigfrid Ericson, celebrating the city's 300th anniversary, and represents the monumental Neo-Classical style in Nordic architecture. It is built of a yellow brick called ”Gothenburg brick” because of the materials frequent use in the city. The museums forms the imposing end of the main street of the city, Kungsportsavenyn.

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Details

Founded: 1923
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Walid Taha (3 months ago)
Nithin Revadal (3 months ago)
Since I had a time limit for the visit, couldn't finish all of it, but the experience was great..! It's not only you get to see the fine art, but you get to try some fun arts as well..
Eva Milstein-Touesnard (3 months ago)
This is my all-time second favorite museum in the world (that I have seen)!!!! It had a really cool exhibit by an artist who I think was Colombian and there was a phone app and WiFi to go along with it. I don’t think this exhibit was permanent but it was great so if you can see it, I’d recommend it. There is also this small, side exhibit about photography of the first moon landing that is permutant but many people missed it. I really enjoyed that though so look out for it! Plus there about 4 other floors full of many different types of art until it got to the top floor which seemed to be the oldest art pieces.
Malin Grön (5 months ago)
Surprisingly well kept considered it is not _the_ national museum. I'm a regular visitor and still find new little gems every now and then
Vincas Razma (5 months ago)
Good and strong swedish and mixed artwork selection on permanent display. You can see few periods of paintings in multiple galleries, as well as some modern/abstract art in places around museum. Whole permanent display can be visited in 2 hours, so good for quick visit. Shop provides good amount of postcards, books and fun stuff.
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