The old Kronhuset (the Crown House) behind the Gustav Adolf Square is one of the oldest buildings in Gothenburg. It was built in 1642-1654 as a storehouse for military uniforms and other military equipment. Now it is a living craft center in historic buildings.

Around Kronhuset is Kronhusbodarna (the Crown House Sheds).The west wing served as carriage storage and warehouse, and was built around 1750 after the previous wooden buildings around Kronhuset burned down. The east wing was built in 1759 for artillery weapon smiths, turners and saddlers. Sweden was at this time mobilizing for war with Denmark and the demande for a warehouse in Gothenburg was therefore high.

Kronhuset was built in Dutch style, and apart from the brick walls and ceiling, it's made entirely of wood. It is six stories high and the ground floor has no supporting pillars, which means that you could more easily move around guns and vehicles.

When the parliament convened in Gothenburg Kronhuset also functioned as parliament house. Nowadays the neighborhood is a vibrant craft centre. In the small sheds the are shops for glassworks, chocolate, candy, furniture, clocks, pottery and leather. There is also a popular cafe and bakery.

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Founded: 1642-1654
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

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