Medical History Museum

Gothenburg, Sweden

History of health and medical care is exhibited in a 200-year-old former hospital. The museum is located in the Oterdahl building, donated by wholesaler Aron Oterdahl in 1808 to Sahlgren hospital as a gift “for time eternal”. The exhibition is set up based on various, still current, themes and presents a history of the development of western medicine from antiquity to our times.

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Details

Founded: 1808
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katja Girnus (4 years ago)
Väldigt intressant museum! Kommer att återkomma.
Daniëlle Flokstra (4 years ago)
Nice little museum about the history of medicine in Gothenburg and in general. The museum is small, but there's quite a lot of information in each room, accompanied by various pictures and displayed items. I especially liked the last room about the history of psychiatry through the years. As I've mentioned there's a lot of information so to get the most out of this museum you must be willing to read quite a bit while you're there. You can tell a lot of effort went into the displays.
Viruthachalampillai Subramanian (4 years ago)
Good place to see
Mats Williams (5 years ago)
It's cool......
Elisa Andersson (5 years ago)
Nice place, very interesting. Signs are only in Swedish.
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