Christina Church

Gothenburg, Sweden

The Christina church (or German Church) was consecrated in 1648 and named after Queen Christina. The octagonal chapel for Rutger von Aschenberg was built in 1681, possibly by Erik Dahlberg. The tower, designed by Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz 1780, rises powerfully over the lower urban buildings around it. It became an important symbol of the great German Assembly which included the Dutch who over a period in the 1600s represented a fifth of the city's population. Although the church was burnt on several occasions it managed to keep the walls of Dutch tiles from the 1630s. In an extensive renovation in 2001 the facades was covered with yellow plaster.

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Details

Founded: 1648
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

www.dotoday.se
inzumi.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sareh shafiee (3 years ago)
Small beautiful church and easy access.
Clive Joannides (3 years ago)
Beautiful church very polite and welcoming ❤️
Moa Hasselberg (3 years ago)
Vacker kyrka med engelskspråkig församling. Välkomnande atmosfär.
Dudley Hicks (3 years ago)
Jag var där på kyrkbasar, väldigt bra.
Ron רון (6 years ago)
Nice looking church but nothing too special, you'll see when strolling the town but don't necessarily put it on the 'must-see' places.
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