St. Casimir's Church

Vilnius, Lithuania

St. Casimir’s Church was founded by the Jesuits and dedicated to Lithuania’s patron saint Prince Casimir Jagiellon (1458-1484). The construction of the glorious building began in 1604 and was completed in 1635. Burnt to the ground just 20 years later when the Russians invaded in 1655, conflagration visited twice again within the next century in 1709 and 1749 before the architect, mathematician and astronomer Tomas Žebrauskas (Pol. Thomas Zubrówka, 1714-1758) restored it to more or less the form it's seen in today.

Over the centuries the church fell into the hands of the Augustinians, Napoleon’s Grande Armée, the Russian Orthodox Church (who significantly altered its appearance), the Lutherans (who used it as the garrison church for the occupying German Army during WWI) and others, including the Soviets who turned the whole place into a museum of atheism no less. Returned to the Catholic Church in 1988, the building was consecrated in 1991 and has since undergone a massive renovation project, restoring its predominantly Baroque style with Gothic and Renaissance touches. Of particular interest inside are three late Baroque altars and a recently discovered 17th-century crypt containing dark bas-reliefs featuring miscellaneous religious motifs.

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Founded: 1604-1635
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nazanin G (4 months ago)
It’s a modern church to me, although the height could represent the gothic style but the simplicity and emptiness of the walls inside, lightened the atmosphere. Nice church nice experience ??
이빨부자 Leebbal (4 months ago)
My favorite place in Vilnius it is very Lithuanian color
Kana Katrin (6 months ago)
I am not big fan of churches, but this church was just next level beautiful and pretty, just woah ???
Rasa G. (7 months ago)
Cool, literally cool place for wonderful summer concerts.
澳洲Jenny Huang (2 years ago)
Named after the Lithuanian saints, the Church of Saint Casimir was built in 1604-1615. It is a model of the oldest Baroque architecture in Vilnius.
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