Holy Cross Church

Kaunas, Lithuania

The monks of the Order of Carmelites bought several plots of land for the monastery in Kaunas near the Nemunas river in 1706. Some years earlier, the Holy Cross Church (Šv. Kryžiaus bažnyčia) was sanctified nearby in 1685 and consecrated in 1700. The church was built in the late Baroque style. It is a two tower building of Latin cross shape. The painting in the main dome represents the prophet Elijah. It was created in the second half of the 18th century. After the spread of cholera epidemic, Tsarist Russian government established the hospital on the first floor of the monastery in 1831.

The church and the monastery were closed in 1845 and since when were used as a store house for carts and harness. At the same time the interior of the church was vandalized. The St. Cross Church of Kaunas was returned to the believers only in 1881. During the renovation from 1885 till 1898, five new sanctuaries were built, the pulpit, the organ, as well as three new bells were installed. Tyrolean artist John Kerle decorated the vaults of the church with the seventeen compositions in 1898. The church was renovated once more in 1925-1934. The Holy Cross Church of Kaunas was included into the Registry of Immovable Cultural Heritage Sites of the Republic of Lithuania in 1996.

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Details

Founded: 1685-1700
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

k urbo (5 months ago)
Viskas puiku .
arunas mackevicius (5 months ago)
Ramybe :)
Ramunas Kaz (5 months ago)
Lankytina vieta ne tik piligrimams, bet ir senosios architektūros gerbėjams
Jonas Kirkliauskas (6 months ago)
Very clear energy, good atmosphere.
Artūras S. (10 months ago)
Kauno Šv. Kryžiaus (Karmelitų) bažnyčia
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