Church of St. Francis Xavier

Kaunas, Lithuania

Church of St. Francis Xavier (Šv. Pranciškaus Ksavero bažnyčia) is located in the Old Town of Kaunas. The church dedicated to St. Francis Xavier was built at the Town Hall Square in the Old Town of Kaunas by Jesuits. They opened their first residence in Kaunas in 1642 and established a chapel in the House of Perkūnas in 1643. Later they also founded a first four-form school in the city in 1649. The construction of the church started in 1666, and it was consecrated in 1722.

Tsarist Russian government gave the church to the Orthodox church for their use in 1824. The church was against assigned to the Jesuits only in 1924. After Lithuania was occupied by Soviets the St. Francis Xavier church was turned into a technical school, the interior of the church was used as a hall of sports. The church was returned again to the Jesuits in 1989. A renovation of the church took place in 1992.

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Details

Founded: 1759
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MrTheZeron (8 months ago)
to fancy
vikesh sarode (9 months ago)
Holy place
Nigelpotts Potts (9 months ago)
Beautiful building, set in a large Sq
Joshua Polivka (12 months ago)
Historical
Eugenijus Tiskus (4 years ago)
Very good
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