Kaunas Priest Seminary

Kaunas, Lithuania

Kaunas Priest Seminary is the largest seminary in Lithuania serving the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kaunas. It was established after the 1863 Uprising. After the January Uprising of 1863, the seat of Bishop of Samogitia Motiejus Valančius was moved from Varniai to Kaunas on December 3, 1863. The Seminary was offered the monastery of Cistercians and St. George Church. From 1863 to 1870 the seminary's capacity was limited, since officials of the Russian Empire did not permit new enrollments.

Antanas Baranauskas taught there for some time, initiating lectures using the Lithuanian language. Many of its students were active in Lithuanian book smuggling. In 1884 its students began printing a Lithuanian-language newspaper ('Lietuva'), edited by Adomas Dambrauskas-Jakštas. Fearing persecution by the Tsarist authorities, seminary leaders closed the newspaper. In 1888 a secret Lithuanian society was established, which was transformed into the St. Casimir Society in 1889. In 1892 Maironis was appointed a professor there and this move had a major impact on usage of the Lithuanian language. After Maironis left for St. Petersburg, Adomas Dambrauskas-Jakštas was appointed as the chaplain and continued Maironis' work. In 1909 Maironis was appointed as the rector of the seminary. At that time the seminary was completely Lithuanian.

During World War I, the seminary moved to Vašuokėnai estate near Troškūnai and the building in Kaunas was converted to a military hospital. Between 1926 and 1940, 3,078 students graduated from the Seminary. After Lithuania was occupied by the Soviet Union, all other priest seminaries in Lithuania were closed. The number of students was at first limited to 150 - the limit gradually decreased to 25. Most of the seminary buildings were confiscated; the Church of Holy Trinity was turned into a warehouse; a library containing some 90,000 volumes was destroyed; and many priests were deported to Siberia. Between 1945 and 1981, 428 priests graduated. After Lithuania declared independence in 1990, the seminary reacquired its former buildings, which were restored before the visit of Pope John Paul II in 1993.

The Church of the Holy Trinity, built in 1624-1634, is part of the Seminary. It represents the late Renaissance style.

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    Founded: 1863
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    User Reviews

    Monika S (2 years ago)
    Hier entstand eine Jesuiten-Kirche, dem Hl. Stanislaus gewidmet, und ein Jesuiten-Kloster im barocken Baustil, den die Jesuiten mit der ersten Kirche Il Gesu in Rom prunkvoll begonnen haben. Glanz und Gloria sollten die Konvertiten wieder in den Schoß der katholischen Mutter Kirche zurück bringen. Heute beherbergen die Gebäude ein Priester-Seminar.
    Marek Pospieski (2 years ago)
    Piękne obiekty z historycznie polskimi akcentami. Miejsce pielgrzymki Jana Pawła II.
    Kristina Kalinauskiene (2 years ago)
    Šiaulių lopšelio-darželio "Pasaka" atstovės dėkoja už šiltą priėmimą ir įdomią viešnagę Kauno kunigų seminarijoje! Išsivežame puikius įspūdžius!
    Alvydas V. (3 years ago)
    Viena iš trijų Lietuvoje veikiančių Kunigų seminarijų . Tai švietimo įstaiga, kurioje rengiami katalikų dvasininkai.
    Osvis (4 years ago)
    I studied here anotomy of women body.
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