House of Perkunas

Kaunas, Lithuania

House of Perkūnas is one of the most original and archaic Gothic secular buildings, located in the Old Town of Kaunas, Lithuania. Originally built by Hanseatic merchants and served as their office from 1440 till 1532, it was sold in the 16th century to the Jesuits who had established a chapel there in 1643. The Jesuits have also completed the Church of St. Francis Xavier at the Town Hall Square in 1722.

The ruined house was rebuilt in the 19th century and served as a school and theatre, which was attended by Polish-Lithuanian poet Adam Mickiewicz. At the end of the 19th Century it was renamed 'House of Perkūnas', when a figure, interpreted by the romantic historians of that time as an idol of the Baltic pagan god of thunder and the sky Perkūnas was found in one of its walls. Today, the house of Perkūnas once again belongs to the Jesuits and houses a museum of Adam Mickiewicz.

Lithuanian historian, theologian and translator Albert Wijuk Kojałowicz was born in the house.

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Details

Founded: 1440
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Lithuania

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vaidrius Smilinskas (17 months ago)
Classy!
Michał Kołodziej (18 months ago)
Magnificent building. It is a must see during visit in Kaunas. Just take few steps from central market and you travel in time to medieval times. Whole facade is very astonishing with it's intricate decorations. Maybe the surroundings isn't medieval at all, the house defends itself.
Jolanta Šostakienė (2 years ago)
It's a wow! architecture. Another building "must to visit"
STUART GIBBONS (2 years ago)
Unfortunately was not open but architecturally very interesting.
Sophie Trudeau (2 years ago)
Building outside is interesting architecture. Inside there is nothing to much to see. 2€ . Possible to dress in medieval costume for an extra small fee.
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