Kabile manor lands was originally owned by Heinrich von Soblech (around 1580). Duke Wilhelm gave this feud to Matthias II von der Recke in 1619. Manor became the property of Jochan Ditrich von Behr in 1687. Since 1810 it was owned by Count Heinrich von Keiserling, who sold this property to Otto von Lieven in 1854. After the death of his son Kabile manor was managed by widow Baroness von Wolf born von der Recke. She lost her rights on the lands of the manor after the agrarian reform in 1920.

Architectural complex of the manor developed since the 17th century. Oldest buildings of the complex are the old manor house (built in the 17th century) and the stable. Buildings are situated around the regularly shaped yard. Servants' houses were built in a distance from the main road to the yard. Current Baroque manor house was built for Eleonora von Behr in the 3rd quarter of the 18th century. In he White Hall still preserved one of the unique decorative interiors finishes of the Rococo period. There also have preserved decorations lied on at the time of reconstruction of the 60s of the 19th century.

Regularly shaped garden was made at the manor house in the 18th century. Later in the mid-19th century there was added landscape park with pond. Origins of the park were made by Count Heinrich von Keiserling and von Lieven continued planting different exotic trees and plants in the garden and wood park.

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Piena iela, Kabile, Latvia
See all sites in Kabile

Details

Founded: 1734-1740
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.pilis.lv

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