Aizupe Manor (Latvian: Aizupes muižas pils) was built in late classicism style in 1823. In 1561 the estate was the property of the Duke, who granted the manor to his counselor Salamon Henning. In 1719, the manor became property of his heirs, and later von Koskulu's, and von Mirbahu's. From 1793 to 1920, the manor was in the hands of the Hahn family.

The manor then remained a 19th century farm complex with residential houses, large barns with ramps, distillery, and a park established between 1830-1840 next to the manor house until the beginning of the 20th century. From 1939 to 1945, it was occupied by the Cīrava Forest School, and from the 1945 to 1985 by the Forest Technical School. Since the 1990s it has been under control of the Cīrava municipal council.

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Founded: 1823
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

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