Ulvåsa Manor

Motala, Sweden

Ulvåsa, or Ulfåsa, is an mansion by lake Boren outside Motala in Östergötland, Sweden. The construction of the present mansion began in the 16th century. In the early 19th century a third floor was added and it got its present architecture.

The medieval Ulvåsa was situated a few kilometers west of the present mansion. Today, there are ruins left of the manor where SaintBridget of Sweden lived most of her life. After the death of her husband the manor was abandoned and a new resident was built at Brittås, 1 km south of the current mansion.

The mansion is a private residence and is not open to the public. A walking trail circulate the mansion and leads through the English park, which is open to the public all year.

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Address

Ulvåsa 101, Motala, Sweden
See all sites in Motala

Details

Founded: 1740
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

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