Sztum Castle was built between 1326-1331. It functioned as a bridge-head protection the Malbork fortress from the South. At that time a stone and brick wall with a gate and one or possibly two corner towers surrounded the territory of the castle hill.

The extension of the castle complex carried out in the 14th century was commenced starting from the southern and eastern wings. The wing that functioned as a summer residence of Grand Master was built in the years 1416-1418 at the Western wing. Not considering shorter breaks, the castle in Sztum was under the control of the Teutonic Knights" Order until 1466 when it had to be passed to Poland in consequence of the Torurn Peace Treaty and became the residence of Polish starosts for many year. In the period 1530-1624 the castle was considerably redesigned, which consisted mainly in constructing new charring buildings on the castle grounds.

The castle was destroyed after the Swedish invasion and rebuilt in the years 1660-1664. As a result of the next de­struction after the fire of the city in 1683 and the third Polish­Swedish war, all the roofs of the castle towers were burnt apart from the one covering the gate tower.In 1772 Sztum found itself again under the German control and the castle became the seat of the Prussian Treasury Management and since the beginning of the 19th century the location of the District Court. After 1776 and in the years 1812, 1819, 1864-1866 and 1899 a systematic demolition of the castle wall and the rebuilding of the wings was the case.

The overhaul works were significantly limited in 1929 when only ruined parts were renovated and the entrance gate was partly reconstructed. After 1945 District Court found its location in a preserved, 19th century part of the castle, whereas the southern wing was divided in flats.

The Historic Museum of Powisle situated in the southern wing in 1968 was closed at the beginning of the 80"s because of the overhaul works undertaken in the southern part of the castle The said have not been finished until present day. The council of the city and commune of Sztum adopted a resolution to develop and manage the area of the Castle Hill. Nowadays, historic dances, staging some events, archery, cross-bow shows, as well as presentations given by foot knights who fight with va­rious types of medieval weapon remind the inhabitants and numerous tourists about the eventful history of the city. Tournaments, knightly tourneys, pleinair painting and major celebrations connected with the Days of the Sztum District are held in or at the foot of the castle.

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W³adys³awa IV, Sztum, Poland
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Founded: 1326-1331
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katarzyna Bialkowska (23 months ago)
It's a very nice small castle which you are free to visit. There is a nice green space to play and have fun with your kids ( and an apple tree with delicious apples) . It is being restored at the moment so I'm not sure what the visiting conditions will be...
Иван Давыдов (2 years ago)
Удобно расположенный и укрепленный замок в Штуме был в четырнадцатом веке прекрасной исходной базой для вылазок в Литву для Тевтонского ордена Тевтоны завоевали Помезанский Штум в 1236 году.На месте деревянного града орден построил оборонительную крепость из камня и кирпича,которая являлась резиденцией войта крестоносцев.Конструкция замка отличалась от большинства замков крестоносцев,строившихся в четырнадцатом веке.Он был построен на плане неправильного пятиугольника,а не как обычно квадрата.Формой строения напоминавшего остров,на котором в средневековье находился Штум.Холм был окружен рвом и стеной,в которую была встроена входная башня и две бронебашни. На данный момент большая часть замка находится на реконструкции.работает небольшая выставка
Gvidas Bycius (2 years ago)
Nice
wchadzynski76 (2 years ago)
Beautiful place
Jacek Tymicki (3 years ago)
ok
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