Sztum Castle was built between 1326-1331. It functioned as a bridge-head protection the Malbork fortress from the South. At that time a stone and brick wall with a gate and one or possibly two corner towers surrounded the territory of the castle hill.

The extension of the castle complex carried out in the 14th century was commenced starting from the southern and eastern wings. The wing that functioned as a summer residence of Grand Master was built in the years 1416-1418 at the Western wing. Not considering shorter breaks, the castle in Sztum was under the control of the Teutonic Knights" Order until 1466 when it had to be passed to Poland in consequence of the Torurn Peace Treaty and became the residence of Polish starosts for many year. In the period 1530-1624 the castle was considerably redesigned, which consisted mainly in constructing new charring buildings on the castle grounds.

The castle was destroyed after the Swedish invasion and rebuilt in the years 1660-1664. As a result of the next de­struction after the fire of the city in 1683 and the third Polish­Swedish war, all the roofs of the castle towers were burnt apart from the one covering the gate tower.In 1772 Sztum found itself again under the German control and the castle became the seat of the Prussian Treasury Management and since the beginning of the 19th century the location of the District Court. After 1776 and in the years 1812, 1819, 1864-1866 and 1899 a systematic demolition of the castle wall and the rebuilding of the wings was the case.

The overhaul works were significantly limited in 1929 when only ruined parts were renovated and the entrance gate was partly reconstructed. After 1945 District Court found its location in a preserved, 19th century part of the castle, whereas the southern wing was divided in flats.

The Historic Museum of Powisle situated in the southern wing in 1968 was closed at the beginning of the 80"s because of the overhaul works undertaken in the southern part of the castle The said have not been finished until present day. The council of the city and commune of Sztum adopted a resolution to develop and manage the area of the Castle Hill. Nowadays, historic dances, staging some events, archery, cross-bow shows, as well as presentations given by foot knights who fight with va­rious types of medieval weapon remind the inhabitants and numerous tourists about the eventful history of the city. Tournaments, knightly tourneys, pleinair painting and major celebrations connected with the Days of the Sztum District are held in or at the foot of the castle.

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W³adys³awa IV, Sztum, Poland
See all sites in Sztum

Details

Founded: 1326-1331
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gaspard Siestrunck (4 months ago)
Small castle with, unfortunately, not much to see. A walk along the lake near by makes it worth it with nice scenery.
Michael (7 months ago)
Amazing medieval castle in Sztum
Jörn Fischer (14 months ago)
I arrived at 16:05 and although I already had purchased a ticket and the castle is supposed to be open until 17:00 the gates were closed and the guard wouldn't let me even take a picture of the courtyard... There is hardly enough to see for 30 minutes and I don't even care to come back here another time! Just go to Malbork which is much better anyways.
Anna dG (20 months ago)
Small castle with small exhibition. Good view.
Katarzyna Bialkowska (2 years ago)
It's a very nice small castle which you are free to visit. There is a nice green space to play and have fun with your kids ( and an apple tree with delicious apples) . It is being restored at the moment so I'm not sure what the visiting conditions will be...
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