Kläckeberga Church

Kalmar, Sweden

Kläckeberga Church was built in the early 13th century, but was subsequently burned by the Danes in 1611. Today, the interior of the church consists mostly of furnishings and objects from the 18th century and later.

The church originally had three floors: a cellar, main floor (the present church hall) and a larger hall above that. In addition, there was once a shooting attic above that hall. So Kläckeberga Church was also once a fortified church, surrounded by several earthwork walls and moats. Historical notes from the 15th century also indicate that various garrisons were stationed in this church during the many battles for Kalmar and Kalmar Castle.

Today the most significant artefact in the church is a altarpiece painted by Herman Han in 1616. It was transferred to Sweden as a loot from Poland during the Thirty Years War.

References:
  • Kalmar Tourism
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www2.kalmar.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Sandgren (14 months ago)
Such an awesome experience. Would like to see inside sometime
Lars Wallsten (2 years ago)
As churches are most. However, beautiful and special.
Billy Ullaeus (2 years ago)
Nice old church
Per-Erik Håkansson (2 years ago)
A small and interesting church from the 13th century!
Tanja Fransson SKANSENSKOLAN (5 years ago)
Super-sweet evening but murder mystery will definitely come again.
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