Voxtorp Church

Ljungbyholm, Sweden

Voxtorp is one of the two interesting round churches in the Kalmar region. It was built at the beginning of the 13th century as the church of a large medieval farm. According to a legend, Voxtorp Church was built by a rich woman named Lona, who built it so she would not need to go to the church a gentry in Halltorp built on his manor.

Like the other churches in the area, Voxtorp became a fortified church. During the 13th century, this area was a vulnerable part of the country, threatened by Vandal pirates from the sea, and Danes from Blekinge. The fact that Voxtorp, like the neighboring church in Hagby, was a round church can be a result of the influence from the Danish island of Bornholm. There are no objects left from the earliest period of this church. The present appearance of the church is a result of a major restoration after lightning hit the church in 1958.

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Address

533, Ljungbyholm, Sweden
See all sites in Ljungbyholm

Details

Founded: c. 1240
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www2.kalmar.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roger Artback (9 months ago)
Nice cemetery. Far down to Minneslund Far to go for my Mother.
Carina Bernhardsson (2 years ago)
Fantastic beautiful old church! I was there at graduation.
Berith Fredriksson (3 years ago)
The grove is very nice. You can sit apart with your thoughts and tears. The waterfall is relaxing.
peter Lund (3 years ago)
It's a nice church But there could be more people at the service
L C (4 years ago)
Beautiful place
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