Rikalanmäki was one of the most remarkable Bronze and Iron Age towns in Finland. According legends, It was a very wealthy trading centre. The heyday of Rikalanmäki was in 11th and 12th centuries when Vikings and foreign merchants exchanged metals and weapons to fur from inner Finland. There are evidences of indirect trade connections even to the Arabic countries. According the legend Birger Jarl landed to the Rikala harbor to start the second crusade to Finland.

Archeologists have found several remarkable treasures from the ancient cemetery in Rikalanmäki including swords, personal equipments, money and remains of clothes. Most valuable artifacts are so-called Sword of Gicelin and silver jewels named as “Halikon käädyt”. Both findings are from the 12th century and situated to National Museum in Helsinki.

Rikalanmäki hill is one of the most significant archaeological sites in Finland as well as one of the most important cultural landscapes protected by the National Board of Antiquities in South-west Finland. A signposted archaeological trail sheds light on the rich past of the hill. Exhibitions and an open-air theatre in summer, as well as a summertime restaurant.

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Address

Rikalantie 36-60, Salo, Finland
See all sites in Salo

Details

Founded: ca. 900-1100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Finland
Historical period: Iron Age (Finland)

More Information

www.salo.fi
www.turku.fi

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3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Titta Liettu (3 years ago)
Mikko Raussi (4 years ago)
Upea kokonaisuus, hyvä ruokapaikka.
Tiina Ketola (4 years ago)
Kaunis paikka palvelu asiantuntevaa ja laadukasta.
Anu Peussa (4 years ago)
Tärkeä
Eero Jääskeläinen (4 years ago)
Hieno miljöö ja palvelu verstaan myymälässä erinomaista
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